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hello, my name is Jen. This is mostly a place for reblogs of art stuffs, science stuffs, and cute stuffs.

art blog: day by atmosphere // art sites: DA , pixiv

illustratedvancouver:

The Rocky Mountains, from Calgary to Vancouver by Mrs. Adelaide Langford, 1916, as seen in the lobby of Vancouver’s Waterfront Station. Born circa 1856 Adelaide Elizabeth Winyard Hurd, she passed away in 1939, living to about age 83. From The Hedley Gazette, March 29, 1917:

Review of C.P.R. Work for 1916
Important Undertakings Marked the Activities of the Company During the Year

The year 1916 was an interesting one in the history of the Canadian Pacific Railway. It has been a year of progress even though the Dominion is struggling in a great war…

…The walls of the spacious waiting hall of the new Canadian Pacific Railway Station at Vancouver have been recently beautified by a series of rural decorations representing the principal mountains from Calgary to Vancouver. The decorations are the work of Mrs. Adelaide Langford, an artist with a wide reputation…

While Mrs. Adelaide Langford may have had a wide reputation at the time of the article, she is not well remembered today. I came upon an article from 1927 when she was about 71 which provides further insights into her work. Below is a transcript of the article from 1927 seen above:

The Morning Leader - August 6, 1927

Pictures by Canadian Woman Adorn Many European Homes

Duke of Cambridge and Other Noted Collectors Have Acquired Paintings From Brush of Vancouver Artist

To have the work of one’s life adorn many of the stately mansions of the world is the proud achievement of one western woman in the person of Mrs. Adelaide Langford of Vancouver, B.C., many of whose canvases are hung in old ancestral homes in Europe, the late Duke of Cambridge, Sir Augustus Nanton and other distinguished collectors having acquired her work throughout England, Canada and the United States.

Mrs. Langford, whose pictures bear the signature “Adelaide Langford,” is the widow of the late Capt. H. Ayliffe Langford, and is a truly western artist of no mean ability. She is a student of the Slade school, London University, England, and is also a graduate of the Art Institute of Chicago, having studied under Frederick W. Freer, W. M. R. French and John H. Vanderpoel of Chicago, and has completed most of her work in the west. She inherits her artist gifts from parents and grandparents who were painters. She is the daughter of the late Thomas Gladwin Hurd, formerly of Toronto.

Mrs. Langford paints in a broad, free style, which has the distinction of the Barbizon school and marked individuality. She is a wonderful colorist and her canvases are truly decorative as well as restful. They are pictures which one can live with from day to day, finding added charm as they become more familiar. Among her recent works is an oil painting of the buffalo at Banff, Alta., completed just before the big drive when so many hundreds were extinguished. This hangs in the rotunda of the Royal Alexandra hotel in Winnipeg.

In an exhibit she is presenting now at Vancouver she is showing a painting of the Indian reserve at West Vancouver and the Indian village at North Vancouver; these are particularly attractive. She is also displaying her “Fraser Canyon,” painted at Yale, B.C., where the waters roar and tumble hundreds of feet below the railway line, and which is one of the beauty spots of the Rockies. In this Mrs. Langford has shown her knowledge and understanding of the great outdoors. The collection also includes pictures of English and continental scenery.

Mrs. Langford lost her husband during service of the late war; her son also served for several years in the motor boat patrol in the North Sea as well as Russia on special service and in the Arctic, for which he was decorated by the British and Russian governments. Mrs. Langford’s own charitable work will always remain in the minds of those who were closely associated with her during that time, and she was never at any time too engrossed in her own troubles that she could not find time to aid those less fortunate than herself.

[the original article incorrectly named John D. Vanderpoel instead of John H. Vanderpoel, and the Barbizon school was misspelled as the Barbazon school; these two errors are shown corrected in the text above]

According to Gary Sim’s British Columbia Artists:

An article “The Fine Arts”, published June 9, 1923 in the Western Women’s Weekly, noted that Langford was a critic of the Studio Club. The Vancouver Studio Club and School of Art was a predecessor organization to the B.C. Society of Fine Arts, and began exhibiting in Vancouver as early as 1904. Founding members of the group included T.W. Fripp and Spencer Perceval Judge.

And according to National Soul: Canadian Mural Painting, 1860s - 1930s, “Langford’s brother-in-law was general superintendent of the Pacific Division of the Canadian Pacific Railway and likely was helpful in securing the commission for her.”

Ironically, the placement of these paintings at Waterfront Station so far from our line of sight has probably helped to preserve them. At the time of writing, it is not clear if any of her other paintings have survived. The Royal Alexandra Hotel in Winnipeg was demolished in 1971, though the dining room from the hotel has been preserved and rebuilt in Cranbrook at the Canadian Museum of Rail Travel. An email to the museum has determined that no paintings were included in the reconstructed hotel dining room. The CPR Archives has no record of the painting’s whereabouts either. It is unknown if paintings from the collection of Prince George, the late Duke of Cambridge, or Sir Augustus Nanton have survived. Just to be sure, I’ve sent a letter to the senior archivist at Windsor Castle…perhaps one of Adelaide Langford’s paintings has been passed down to the Royal family and remains in their collection to this day. I’ll keep you posted if I receive a reply…

Very interesting! I’ve been at Waterfront Station a lot lately, and wondered about the story behind these paintings.

— 1 year ago with 16 notes
#vancouver  #art  #art on transit 
illustratedvancouver:

Sketches of Vancouver by Jo Scott-B, a sketchbook, revisiting Neighbourhoods walked with John Atkin.

illustratedvancouver:

Sketches of Vancouver by Jo Scott-B, a sketchbook, revisiting Neighbourhoods walked with John Atkin.

— 1 year ago with 11 notes
#art  #houses  #sketch  #vancouver 

raincoatsgeorge:

emmyc:

typette:

oh-totoro:

Studio Ghibli have officially announced their next two releases, to be in theatres in 2013. Hayao Miyazaki’s ‘Kaze Tachinu’ (The Wind Rises), and Isao Takahata’s ‘Kaguya-hime no Monogatari’ (The Tale of Princess Kaguya).

HOLY SHIT GHIBLI IS DOING THE BAMBOO PRINCESS STORY. PREPARE FOR TEARS 

!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Hot damn, an artist story?! ♥

Oh yeah, this reminded me.

There is a Ghibli Festival at Pacific Cinematheque (Vancouver)! It runs until Jan 3.

I want to watch them all ;A;

— 1 year ago with 21356 notes
#Ghibli  #Studio Ghibli  #miyazaki  #vancouver  #movies 
illustratedvancouver:

The Dominion Building, in situ; another great sketch by Matthew Cencich, via flickr.

Huh. I know this building, but I just realized how tall it actually is.

illustratedvancouver:

The Dominion Building, in situ; another great sketch by Matthew Cencich, via flickr.

Huh. I know this building, but I just realized how tall it actually is.

— 1 year ago with 17 notes
#vancouver  #art  #sketch 

illustratedvancouver:

Vintage Shell decal from Vancouver, BC, via ebay. The seller road_trip_magnets has done a remarkable job compiling this series of travel decals from all across the USA, and just ONE from Canada! Even he doesn’t know how many they produced, but he’s found at least 65 of them so far. He is dating them from the 1920s, as one commemorates San Francisco’s Diamond Jubilee September 5-12, 1925; another celebrates the Pasadena Tournament of Roses, New Years Day, 1928.

Shell has a history of strong advertising campaigns, with many of their early posters seen as works of fine art today. The National Motor Museum in the UK has it’s own Shell Art Collection, and I wonder if this decal campaign was following in the footsteps of similar promotions overseas. Some of the leading artists that Shell used in the UK in the 1930s included John Armstrong, Ben Nicholson, Graham Sutherland, Tristram Hillier, Edward McKnight Kauffer and Charles Mozley. I’m not sure if we’ll ever learn who was responsible for these decals, but they’re all quite charming. It would be great if we could learn more about this series!

A cute series for a set of advertisements :3 It makes me think of the province/state quarters that I (half-heartedly) collect.

— 1 year ago with 15 notes
#vancouver  #art  #ads  #shell 

illustratedvancouver:

Perhaps my favourite school yearbook ever, the 1940-41 Lord Selkirk Annual, artfully decorated with woodcuts throughout. Inside, this woodcut of the pacific coast by Jean Ortlieb was achieved when she was just age 14. Thanks again to Neil Whaley for sharing this with me!

— 1 year ago with 2 notes
#art  #vancouver  #Jean Ortlieb 
illustratedvancouver:

On the SkyTrain by Wai Khan Au, 2010, seen at Word Under the Street.

illustratedvancouver:

On the SkyTrain by Wai Khan Au, 2010, seen at Word Under the Street.

— 2 years ago with 4 notes
#art  #skytrain  #vancouver  #Wai  #belugachop 
britleaf:

allthebookspress:

Vancouver’s Oscar’s Art Books Gets the Espresso Book Machine

B.C.’s first Espresso Book Machine — a machine that can print a high-quality, 100-page book in five minutes — now resides at Oscar’s Art Books, an independent, arts-focused bookstore on West Broadway at Granville Street.
“All you need is two PDFs — one for the cover, one for the book — and we can print it,” store manager Barry Bechta said.
Stigmas surrounding self-publishing or “vanity publishing” are slowly fading as new technologies have made it easier, and sometimes more profitable, to take the non-traditional route to printing books.
Self-publishing was often viewed as a self-indulgence for those who wanted to see their names in print. People who can’t convince major publishers to print their books in large volumes have turned to the practice for years, Bechta said. However, as technology shakes up the traditional publishing business model, perceptions about self-publishing are changing. […]
The role of the traditional publisher is to get books into the marketplace, Maurer said. It involves a lot of behind-the-scenes distribution work that people often overlook when they decide to self-publish. “When people propose to self-publish, they’re not cutting out the editor and the publisher — they’re becoming the editor and the publisher.”
For those who do not have a built-in market to sell their books but still want to give self-publishing a try, the Espresso Book Machine is a less expensive option. Printing a book at Oscar’s costs $3 plus three cents per page, and an initial setup fee of $99. A 100-page book costs $5.99 to print. […]
Timing is another advantage of the new machine, which cost the bookstore $120,000. “We’re able to give someone a physical product in their hand in five minutes,” Bechta said. Traditional publishers can take much longer to deliver a book.
Production speed is what led Arsenal Pulp Press, a Vancouver-based independent publishing company, to use the machine at Oscar’s Art Books. The company uses the machine to print advance copies of books that will be released in the fall, Arsenal marketing director Janice Beley said. […]
Oscar’s Art Books is the first private bookstore to own the Espresso Book Machine in Canada. “We see a lot of bookstores going the way of the dodo,” store owner Sean O’Slynn said. “We decided to look at this as an opportunity to revitalize the store.”
Oscar’s Art Books has been in business for 21 years, despite competition from a Chapters outlet that opened across the street 12 years ago.

You can read the rest of the article in the Vancouver Sun. I stole the images from Google because these girls are way cuter than the guy in the Sun article.

amazing

(via theaestheticcurator)
So cool! I want to see it print •3•

britleaf:

allthebookspress:

Vancouver’s Oscar’s Art Books Gets the Espresso Book Machine

B.C.’s first Espresso Book Machine — a machine that can print a high-quality, 100-page book in five minutes — now resides at Oscar’s Art Books, an independent, arts-focused bookstore on West Broadway at Granville Street.

“All you need is two PDFs — one for the cover, one for the book — and we can print it,” store manager Barry Bechta said.

Stigmas surrounding self-publishing or “vanity publishing” are slowly fading as new technologies have made it easier, and sometimes more profitable, to take the non-traditional route to printing books.

Self-publishing was often viewed as a self-indulgence for those who wanted to see their names in print. People who can’t convince major publishers to print their books in large volumes have turned to the practice for years, Bechta said. However, as technology shakes up the traditional publishing business model, perceptions about self-publishing are changing. […]

The role of the traditional publisher is to get books into the marketplace, Maurer said. It involves a lot of behind-the-scenes distribution work that people often overlook when they decide to self-publish. “When people propose to self-publish, they’re not cutting out the editor and the publisher — they’re becoming the editor and the publisher.”

For those who do not have a built-in market to sell their books but still want to give self-publishing a try, the Espresso Book Machine is a less expensive option. Printing a book at Oscar’s costs $3 plus three cents per page, and an initial setup fee of $99. A 100-page book costs $5.99 to print. […]

Timing is another advantage of the new machine, which cost the bookstore $120,000. “We’re able to give someone a physical product in their hand in five minutes,” Bechta said. Traditional publishers can take much longer to deliver a book.

Production speed is what led Arsenal Pulp Press, a Vancouver-based independent publishing company, to use the machine at Oscar’s Art Books. The company uses the machine to print advance copies of books that will be released in the fall, Arsenal marketing director Janice Beley said. […]

Oscar’s Art Books is the first private bookstore to own the Espresso Book Machine in Canada. “We see a lot of bookstores going the way of the dodo,” store owner Sean O’Slynn said. “We decided to look at this as an opportunity to revitalize the store.”

Oscar’s Art Books has been in business for 21 years, despite competition from a Chapters outlet that opened across the street 12 years ago.

You can read the rest of the article in the Vancouver Sun. I stole the images from Google because these girls are way cuter than the guy in the Sun article.

amazing

(via theaestheticcurator)

So cool! I want to see it print •3•

— 2 years ago with 10 notes
#oscar's art books  #vancouver  #self-publishing  #bookstore 

staceythinx:

Flavorwire is back with another gallery of gorgeous libraries from around the globe. This time its the world’s most beautiful public libraries. Click on the images to see which cities are represented above and head over to Flavorwire for more of their 25 Most Beautiful Public Libraries in the World.

I notice the Vancouver Public Library is there C:

— 2 years ago with 303 notes
#libraries  #books  #vancouver 
illustratedvancouver:

spencerjohn:

Vancouver Healing Lodge 31 West Pender (Opening June 11th)

This is going to be a really significant addition to the DTES. I’m really proud a former co-worker of mine was behind this! Actually, he’s VNHS president!
Here’s the background on the building’s heritage from the City of Vancouver administrative report from October 2010:

This building is primarily valued for its architecture and the history of ownership and use. Designed by the same talented architect who designed the World Building (Sun Tower) - W. T. Whiteway, this attractive building was made with high quality brick and the combination of steel columns and fire-resistant millwork floors. The principal facade is characterized by rich surface details, ornamented window surrounds and entablatures. Built in 1913 for Storey and Campbell, owners of the Storey and Campbell Co., this residential building (aka Palmer Rooms) provided lodging on the upper floors, with retail at the ground level. It was conveniently located between the warehouse district and Chinatown, and within walking distance to the major transportation nodes. The building remained in the Storey family until 1946, when it was purchased by Lai Hing. Lai lived in this building and operated his hotel business under Wingate Hotel for about 30 years. Most recently, the building’s name was changed to Pender Hotel.

illustratedvancouver:

spencerjohn:

Vancouver Healing Lodge 31 West Pender (Opening June 11th)

This is going to be a really significant addition to the DTES. I’m really proud a former co-worker of mine was behind this! Actually, he’s VNHS president!

Here’s the background on the building’s heritage from the City of Vancouver administrative report from October 2010:

This building is primarily valued for its architecture and the history of ownership and use. Designed by the same talented architect who designed the World Building (Sun Tower) - W. T. Whiteway, this attractive building was made with high quality brick and the combination of steel columns and fire-resistant millwork floors. The principal facade is characterized by rich surface details, ornamented window surrounds and entablatures.

Built in 1913 for Storey and Campbell, owners of the Storey and Campbell Co., this residential building (aka Palmer Rooms) provided lodging on the upper floors, with retail at the ground level. It was conveniently located between the warehouse district and Chinatown, and within walking distance to the major transportation nodes. The building remained in the Storey family until 1946, when it was purchased by Lai Hing. Lai lived in this building and operated his hotel business under Wingate Hotel for about 30 years. Most recently, the building’s name was changed to Pender Hotel.

— 2 years ago with 22 notes
#vancouver  #architecture  #DTES 
illustratedvancouver:

An ink on paper drawing submitted by Louise Phillips dating back to November 30th, 2005. Louise writes:

I thought of this drawing today, a few years after it was made, but the map of Vancouver and my impression of Richmond remain true to the time of its making.
The drawing is in ink on the cover of an environmentally friendly notebook found on sale in a Steveston shop. I was newly arrived from Toronto and experiencing a strange kind of culture shock. Drawing and writing were a guarantee of sanity.
Perhaps it is timely in this year, 2012 - the Queen’s Jubilee Year, to look back at the past!

Thanks Louise!

illustratedvancouver:

An ink on paper drawing submitted by Louise Phillips dating back to November 30th, 2005. Louise writes:

I thought of this drawing today, a few years after it was made, but the map of Vancouver and my impression of Richmond remain true to the time of its making.

The drawing is in ink on the cover of an environmentally friendly notebook found on sale in a Steveston shop. I was newly arrived from Toronto and experiencing a strange kind of culture shock. Drawing and writing were a guarantee of sanity.

Perhaps it is timely in this year, 2012 - the Queen’s Jubilee Year, to look back at the past!

Thanks Louise!

— 2 years ago with 22 notes
#art  #illustration  #vancouver