KOTUKI

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hello, my name is Jen. This is mostly a place for reblogs of art stuffs, science stuffs, and cute stuffs.

art blog: day by atmosphere // art sites: DA , pixiv
illustratedvancouver:

Manhattan Books and Magazines, an advertising bookmark seen in the book Duthies Bookmarks. The bookstore was a branch of Duthie Books which specialized in magazines, located at 1089 Robson Street. This CBC news article from 1999 tells of the closure of Manhattan Books, and an outdated profile on the web fills in more of the historical details circa 1975-2005:

In 1975 Makoto Inoue immigrated to Vancouver and opened the Japanese bookstore, Sophia Books. By 1999, Inoue was ready to retire. Vancouver was at risk of losing the access to Japanese culture offered by the store. This potential loss coincided with the closing of another culturally diverse bookshop, Manhattan Books. Luckily for Vancouver, Marc Fournier, who had been a manager at Manhattan, and his wife, Inoue’s daughter, decided to merge the concepts of the two stores. Sophia Books re-opened in 2000 as a multi-lingual bookstore on Hastings and Richards. In 2005, the store moved one door over where they continue to offer one of the most comprehensive collections of books from around the world.

Finally, Alex Waterhouse-Hayward waxes poetic about the loss of Sophia Books in an early 2010 blog post. Vive the bookstore, toujours!

illustratedvancouver:

Manhattan Books and Magazines, an advertising bookmark seen in the book Duthies Bookmarks. The bookstore was a branch of Duthie Books which specialized in magazines, located at 1089 Robson Street. This CBC news article from 1999 tells of the closure of Manhattan Books, and an outdated profile on the web fills in more of the historical details circa 1975-2005:

In 1975 Makoto Inoue immigrated to Vancouver and opened the Japanese bookstore, Sophia Books. By 1999, Inoue was ready to retire. Vancouver was at risk of losing the access to Japanese culture offered by the store. This potential loss coincided with the closing of another culturally diverse bookshop, Manhattan Books. Luckily for Vancouver, Marc Fournier, who had been a manager at Manhattan, and his wife, Inoue’s daughter, decided to merge the concepts of the two stores. Sophia Books re-opened in 2000 as a multi-lingual bookstore on Hastings and Richards. In 2005, the store moved one door over where they continue to offer one of the most comprehensive collections of books from around the world.

Finally, Alex Waterhouse-Hayward waxes poetic about the loss of Sophia Books in an early 2010 blog post. Vive the bookstore, toujours!

— 2 years ago with 7 notes
#vancouver  #books  #bookstore  #Sophia books  #illustration  #art 
  1. kotuki reblogged this from illustratedvancouver
  2. theaestheticcurator reblogged this from illustratedvancouver and added:
    I’ve always loved this building.
  3. illustratedvancouver posted this